El Paso reeling after deadly mass shooting

A woman prays at a makeshift memorial for victims of Walmart shooting that left a total of 22 people dead at the Cielo Vista Mall WalMart in El Paso, Texas, on August 5, 2019. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP)

A woman prays at a makeshift memorial for victims of Walmart shooting that left a total of 22 people dead at the Cielo Vista Mall WalMart in El Paso, Texas, on August 5, 2019. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP)

Authorities in the southern state of Texas said the mass shooting, the seventh deadliest in US’s modern history, appeared to be a hate crime.

Ms Reese, 85, was just buying some milk when the warning sign came. “The boy that was working at the isle suddenly looked at me and gestured I had to go to the exit,” she said. “The next moment, I heard shots being fired. We all ran towards the exit, from where we were led to the store next door. While I was there, I could see elderly people coming in, with blood all over them.” Reese owns an apartment right next to a Walmart store at the Cielo Vista Mall in the US border city of El Paso, where a shooter on Saturday killed at least 22 people, including eight Mexicans. Authorities in the southern state of Texas said the mass shooting, the seventh deadliest in US’s modern history, appeared to be a hate crime. Police cited a “manifesto” attributed to the arrested suspect, a 21-year-old white male, as proof that the attack was racially motivated. ‘Shootings all the time’ On Monday morning, the Walmart parking lot next to the shopping centre was busy with people from the neighbourhood, with many bringing flowers and signs to leave on the asphalt. Nearby, an entrance to the store was blocked by...




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